Italy
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Italy
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Italy
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Italy
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Italy
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Italy
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Italian, more than just one language

Over 65-million primarily speak Italian while another 15-million use it as a secondary form of communication. Nearest to Latin than all other Romance languages, Italian spread throughout the world via vast trade networks and the creation of art.

From the Renaissance period and onwards, Italian has served as a primary language for some of the most noteworthy musical compositions. The "language of music" is often characterized as a rhythmic dance brimming with expression and emotion.

Most speakers learn standard Italian alongside their region’s unique dialect or accent. Large-scale immigration and colonialism, however, has created unique variations in dialect and accent throughout the world. To retain full meaning, English to Italian translations are always best done by a native translator.

Interesting facts about the Italian language

Pronunciation  A phonetic language, the majority of Italian vowels and consonants are pronounced uniquely. Consonant digraphs and double consonants are letter combination the create standard sounds.

Accents  Vowels "a, i, o and u" are only allowed to hold the ` accent mark while "e" is able to be written with a ` or ´.

Punctuation  Quotation marks are replaced by « while apostrophes drop the final vowel before a word begins.

Gender  Nouns and pronouns fall within the category of masculine or feminine. Generally, singular masculine words end in an "o" while feminine nouns end with "a".

Plural  Nouns ending in "a" are replaced by an "e" if feminine or with "i" if masculine. Words ending with an "e" or "o" are pluralized with am "i" while nouns ending with stressed vowels remain unchanged.